Tenterden sculptor Lynda Hukins

PUBLISHED: 16:21 08 May 2016 | UPDATED: 16:21 08 May 2016

Tenterden sculptor Lynda Hukins

Tenterden sculptor Lynda Hukins

Manu Palomeque 07977074797

Meet the Kent artist who specialises in bronze animals and birds and is inspired by nature, the countryside and the seaside

Lynda Hukins started her artistic career rather later in life than she would have liked, as her father stopped her from attending art school to pursue a more academic path.

She has lived around the St Michael’s area of Tenterden for the last 40 years and has been in her current studio, a converted farm building originally used as a calfing facility, for the last seven. A basic square with a skylight that Lynda had put in, there is a good work bench, her tools, a sink and lots of natural light from the glass windows.

Lynda says that she has always seen in 3D, so that for her there have been no extra challenges in working as a sculptor rather than painting. “The biggest challenge is that you have to be physically strong and energetic, and you mustn’t mind getting dirty,” she laughs.

Inspired by animals, Lynda has also moved into creating abstract sculptural works. “There is no difference producing something abstract or representational, something that I can see, like a bird. Once I’ve got the idea in my head, I go from that. I do drawings. I have to be careful how big I go because if it’s a commission, a bronze can be very expensive.”

I ask if the work evolves from a design, or whether she can create exactly as she sees. “I have the idea in my head and have the passion to produce what it is I can see, which is very exciting,” she tells me.

What governs the decision to create figurative or abstract? “I have to be slightly commercial, sometimes I have to produce something that will sell, in order to do what I want,” she says.

“Abstract is more difficult to sell; I would do a lot more abstract, but I can’t afford to. A lot of people have a need to understand a work and need to ask ‘what is it?’ The majority don’t understand abstract.”

Lynda explains to me her process of creating a sculpture. “I do make sketches, but I don’t create maquettes. From the beginning I might have ideas from nature and may sketch and then decide what medium I am going to use. At the moment I am using polystyrene, although I used to use wood and sometimes clay.

“I start to sculpt: it’s a process of sculpting down in polystyrene and building up in clay. A polystyrene piece cannot go to the foundry as the work would dissolve, so I apply plaster, possibly mixed with straw to get texture.

“When I’m 100 per cent happy, I go to the foundry in Matfield and they perform a lost wax process, which takes six to eight weeks. I then work on the wax using hot tools before the casting process commences, which may take another four to five weeks for a bronze. Then we start to apply difference chemicals to get colour.”

So what decides the colour? “The colours may range from browns to greeny colours, my tones of choice. There is a process of patination and then the sculpture is waxed again.”

“I used to work in wood but I got to the age when lifting bits of lime and finding wood was getting difficult. Then in 1995 a mentor at the foundry who encouraged me to cast in bronze.”

Lynda’s inspiration is nature, the countryside and the seaside. When younger she travelled to Italy and become enthusiastic about the works of Michelangelo, one of her heroes (she also admires Barbara Hepworth and Elisabeth Frink), and from that time on she wanted to sculpt.

I ask Lynda if art can help in the understanding of life. ”That is a difficult question, but I think art can give a huge amount of pleasure. I think this helps in understanding life. It can make people thoughtful and it’s helpful to produce art for people with mental health problems.

“My friend Naomi Blake was in Auschwitz and works on the suffering of the Jews. However, if you can make somebody laugh or smile, I think you’ve achieved something. Art is incredibly important to me and I think it is for most people”.

For artists who wishes to choose sculpture as a medium, Lynda advises “if they have a passion for 3D then they must go ahead and do it.”

For herself, Lynda’s ambition is to continue to produce her work for sculpture gardens and commissions.

Get in touch

Contact Lynda Hukins for appointments and commissions on 01580 291129

You can see Lynda’s work at the Chart Hills Golf Club, Weeks Lane, Biddenden TN27 8JX

Also visit www.artparks.co.uk and www.youtube.com/watch?v=OD08bfYG2AE to see some of Lynda’s sculptures.

w

More from People

Monday, December 21, 2020

So you think you know your county? Take our New Year quiz and put that local knowledge to the test | Words: Adam Jacot de Boinod

Read more
Sunday, December 13, 2020

Kent has always been noted for its rebellions, its involvement in the Peasants’ Revolt 635 years ago its most famous manifestation. But what were those other Kent rebellions?

Read more
Thursday, December 10, 2020

Kent Life spends a festive morning with Christmas Bake Off star Jane Beedle in her Faversham home. Article first published in Dec 2019

Read more

With light at the end of the Covid tunnel at last, we take heart from how Kent recovered from previous calamities, from the 1930s depression to two world wars and the credit crunch. Article first written in July 2020

Read more

We’re all familiar with blue plaques, but could Kent Life come up with 10 notable births in our county – avoiding the most obvious ones? See if you agree

Read more
Wednesday, November 25, 2020

How the sheep farming heritage of Romney Marsh, an area of great natural beauty but high unemployment, helped inspire the creation of Romney Tweed | Writer: Sarah Sturt - Pictures: Manu Palomeque

Read more
Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Who was your favourite doctor? Tom Baker regularly appears in the top two in Dr Who polls, is still acting and would never rule out a come-back | Words: Bernard Bale

Read more
Thursday, November 19, 2020

You might think you’re a bit of an expert on Kent but when the clock starts counting down, simple facts may start to elude your memory...

Read more

Pets are proving a lifesaver for many, providing companionship and consistency in uncertain times, as these Kent Life readers reveal

Read more
Thursday, November 19, 2020

Working closely with the most seriously ill of patients, Joanna Mitchell knows only too well the difference it can make when they are cared for at home.

Read more
Kent Life Food & Drink awards. Open for entries.

Latest Competitions & Offers



Follow us on Twitter


Like us on Facebook


Local Business Directory

Search For a Car In Your Area

Latest from the Kent Life