JANUARY SALE Subscribe for just £5 today CLICK HERE

5 of the best romantic walks to experience in Kent

PUBLISHED: 11:47 19 February 2018 | UPDATED: 12:50 19 February 2018

Enjoy a stroll around Knole’s 1,000-acre medieval deer park (photo: National Trust/Joe Hatcher)

Enjoy a stroll around Knole's 1,000-acre medieval deer park (photo: National Trust/Joe Hatcher)

©National Trust Images/Jo Hatcher

Enjoy these five romantic walking spots in Kent, together they span our glorious county at its finest

1. Scotney Castle

Romance has long been in the air at this ruined 14th-century moated castle which sits on an island upon a lake. Edward Hussey III built the ‘new castle’ (a country house) and the surrounding landscape in the 19th century.

The last member of the Hussey family to live here was Christopher Hussey, who proposed to his wife-to-be, Betty (Wallis Simpson’s niece), in the castle gardens. After they wed in 1936, they inherited Scotney, where they lived until their deaths. This National Trust castle is surrounded by a vast estate, which encompasses 770 acres of ancient parkland and woods containing veteran trees. Explore the fairytale gardens, and enjoy the two-mile trail around the parkland.

Dogs: Welcome on a lead

Scotney Castle

2. Dungeness

One of the biggest shingle landscapes in the world, the Dungeness National Nature Reserve has an enchantingly rugged beauty.

This rare habitat of shingle ridges, built up over 5,000 years, attracts a wealth of wildlife and 600 species of plants; and has such low rainfall that some refer to it as the UK’s only desert. The flatness and size of the landscape creates a seductive sense of seclusion and freedom, and the echoing quality that amplifies sounds has an eerie magic.

Scan the skies for birds of prey, such as Peregrines, Merlins and Marsh harriers; and enjoy the sight of Bewick’s and Whooper swans. You can walk for miles, from the car park opposite the old lighthouse.

Dogs: Allowed on the wider NNR, but not the RSPB area.

Dungeness and Hastings

3. Knole

Stride around the 1,000-acre medieval deer park, before enjoying the showrooms of the house and discovering the romantic history of Knole. The writer and gardener Vita Sackville-West was born here in 1892 and married Harold Nicholson in the private chapel in 1913, before going on to have a series of affairs with women.

Vita dearly loved Knole, but was unable to inherit because it was entailed to the male line. The novel Orlando, Virginia Woolf’s literary dedication to her friend (and former lover) Vita, is in part inspired by Knole; Vita’s son Nigel Nicholson described it as ‘the longest and most charming love-letter in literature’. The original manuscript – inscribed ‘Vita, from Virginia’ – is kept in the house.

Dogs: Welcome on a lead, if they do not bark at the deer.

Walkers in the mist

4. Blean Woods

Enjoy peaceful trails of between 2-13km (1.25-8 miles) amid this RSPB-managed ancient woodland. During winter, keep eyes and ears alert for Goldcrests, Sparrowhawks, Treecreepers, and Long-tailed Tits.

As spring arrives, with it come the Nightingales – these small birds fly annually from Africa to breed in the UK; the male birds arrive first to build a nest, and then set about the business of luring a mate. They famously do this by singing at night (but they also sing during the day); the song is an enchanting series of high and low peels, warbles and rasps.

Nightjars also arrive in spring; these winged romantics are known for their long, mesmeric churring call, which the male birds sound at night to attract the females.

Dogs: Welcome on the White Trail.

Blean Woods

5. Chartwell

Winston Churchill lived here with his wife Clementine and their young family from 1922. Perhaps because of his struggles with depression, the couple were said to have had a very close, devoted relationship and he dearly loved this country home, which provided him with a family sanctum away from public life.

However, Churchill also liked to entertain and relished taking guests on tours of the gardens, most of which he and Clementine created. Explore the house and the studio (where a collection of Churchill’s own paintings are on display) then set off on walks around the estate.

There are several short circuits, but if you fancy a long stroll, there are 8 km (five-mile) and 9.6 km (six-mile) routes that link to Toys Hills.

Dogs: Welcome on leads.

214 kent Chartwell

More from Out & About

When funds are low and the family is going stir-crazy stuck indoors, here is some fun, free stuff to get you through

Read more
Yesterday, 16:04

The beautiful Hever Castle will launch snowdrop season with a talk followed by a woodland walk

Read more

Regularly voted one of Kent's best places to live, and with easy access to London, let's celebrate Sevenoaks

Read more
Tuesday, January 7, 2020

The elusive snowdrop can be hard to find and before you know it, they're gone again, so we saved you the trouble and found some beautiful spots in Kent to go for a walk among the snowdrops

Read more

Want to get fitter, feed your brain or start a new hobby? The National Trust can help kickstart your 2020 plans

Read more

The run-up to Christmas can be stressful, so escape for a while by spending time reconnecting with nature

Read more
Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Farmer Sandra Fagg adores Christmas and now she and husband Mike run their own reindeer centre and grotto

Read more
Friday, December 6, 2019

Counteract all that festive over-indulgence with a winter walk through National Trust-owned Kentish countryside

Read more
Friday, December 6, 2019

The swashbuckling panto opens this month to Dartford's Orchard Theatre and is sure to keep the whole family laughing

Read more
Tuesday, December 3, 2019

Nothing beats a festive carol concert to get music lovers in the festive spirit - so we've picked some great ones to try

Read more
Kent Life Food & Drink awards. Open for entries.

Subscribe or buy a mag today


subscription ad


Follow us on Twitter


Like us on Facebook


Local Business Directory

Search For a Car In Your Area

Property Search

Most Read

Latest from the Kent Life